Buyer Beware: Understanding Green Claims

Green is everywhere. The general public walks up and down consumer store aisles full of products touting green, sustainability or environmentally friendly. Consumer news stations cover water conservation and energy issues on a regular basis. Governmental bodies are moving forward with the production of legislation requiring minimized energy usage and certified cleaning products and practices. Even our own trade publications put a heavy emphasis on cleaning green.

But what does this all mean? Has “green” become more about business and less about the environment or overall health — the reason for its original inception?

Green has turned into a business and although the majority of products are legitimate, there are going to be companies out there trying to cut corners to make an extra buck on the green trend. To make sure the products you buy are actually green, look past the fancy verbiage on product labels and watch for certification logos. Also examine product ingredients and check the MSDS’s for clarification. If you suspect a product of falsifying green claims, contact the certifying body for confirmation. Some sites even go so far to list the names of products and manufacturers falsely claiming green.

Taking these simple steps will guarantee you are cleaning green, bettering the environment and protecting the health and wellness of the building occupants.

  • in my business i have nearly eliminated all chemical whether green or not by using microfiber sponges and microfiber rags...I still use green toilet cleaner/disinfectant and green mopping solution

  • in my business i have nearly eliminated all chemical whether green or not by using microfiber sponges and microfiber rags...I still use green toilet cleaner/disinfectant and green mopping solution

  • Certifications are certainly helpful but I wonder if they can also stifle creativity and bringing new products to market?  I believe Green Seal charges upwards of $10,000 for each product certified and there are ongoing annual charges to keep your product certified.  Maybe no big deal for the big boys but what about smaller companies wanting to be innovative with new formulations?  Could this be why some manufacturers now have their products certified by an independent third party?